7 degree
bentshaft paddle

Red Rock's Excellence in Paddling
You may have noticed that on this sight, I have a tendency to "toot my own horn" a little here and there about Red Rock's Excellence in Paddling-related Subjects. It;s either with our superior quality Souris River Canoes, or our common sense approach to canoe handling, tie-downs, eating northern pike, crating canoes for shipment, etc. Well the bravado never ends and I'm now going to show you the absolute BEST bent shaft paddle combination for moving any canoe. As of April 14, 2005, there is absolutely no other canoe shop on the planet who recommends this paddle combination and I'm pretty sure they've never even considered this before, ever. So, here goes - this is the very best you can get to move your canoe faster if you are a recreational paddler.

If you've ever used a bentshaft paddle, (and you held it properly) you undoubtedly noticed that the canoe moves faster forward than with the use of straight shaft paddles. That's because a 14 degree (most common bend) paddle is all about "push" in the water.

In a bent shaft paddle, because the handle is bent forward, it clears the paddler's upper torso as it's drawn through the water. The bend allows this paddle to be pulled through the water with BOTH arms for a shorter, but powerful stroke. ("A" represents the water being pushed (or "pulled through" resulting in push "C" to the canoe) That's all a bent shaft it really does well. Because of the bend, more blade pushes water more effectively without lifting water as you'll see on the next page. Doing a J-stroke with a 14 deg. paddle requires that you really do a swing-over-with-the-top-of-the-paddle-handle-maneuver to make a J in the water with the paddle on it's side in rudder position. It's clumsy and inefficient so a lot of what you gained in a powerful stroke, you give up while paddle wrestling.

Bent shaft paddles are really made to paddle using the sit-and-switch racing technique which means that two paddlers are located on opposite sides of the canoe. They paddle with short, fast, synchronised strokes, usually three each, and then one paddler says HUT and they switch simultaneously to the other side without breaking stride. I can paddle like this for about a mile and then my shoulders start to ask what the heck I'm doing that for, anyway? If you like marathon paddling, that's one thing. Otherwise, marathon stroking is kinda dumb for BWCA travel for regular folks. Instead of blowing out all of your ooompf on a race down the lake, my paddle combination will help you improve your present paddling power so you may not be as tired when you finally get there. Read the next page for more.


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